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Lewis Brown and Gary Motley are now friends
4 hours ago
John M Greiner replied to walt tachiki's discussion dual pump in-tank header system/ with GDI viking 130 engine
"Got my inboard and outboard access panels in. I have 1/2 fuel line ready to feed whatever header tank or other solution Viking has.
Any pics or info on your new Fuel Pump System you mentioned. I might have missed it in another post."
yesterday
Viking Aircraft Engines replied to Loren Warner's discussion Fuel Supply Line Aeroquip 601/AE701-6
"The phone rang all day from builders having experienced first hand the effects of leaky gascolators vapor locking fuel pumps and aftermarket filters not working as advertised, etc.

So, what exactly is the perfect fuel system for an experimental aircraft, using an engine sporting electronically controlled fuel injection?

We will answer this, using commercially available parts, without diving into the exotic such as pulse modulated fuel pumps, etc.

From our earlier example, it is clear that builders often view the system as a series of parts, arranged in sequence between the fuel tank and the engine.

These parts, in no specific order, are:

Fuel tank, or tanks, fuel tank screens, low pressure fuel filters - protecting the fuel pumps from contamination, a high pressure fuel filter - protecting the fuel injectors from small unwanted particles, a fuel regulator - sending unwanted / excess fuel back to the fuel tank, a fuel pressure transducer - providing pressure info to the pi…"
Monday
Viking Aircraft Engines left a comment for Lawrence Anderson
""
Monday
Viking Aircraft Engines left a comment for Lawrence Anderson
"Just get one from Honda if you would like to use one"
Monday
Lawrence Anderson left a comment for Lawrence Anderson
"Could a circulating block heater be installed on a Viking engine for cold weather starts or a standard Honda block heater"
Sunday
Lawrence Anderson left a comment for Lawrence Anderson
"Could a circulating engine block heater be installed on a Viking engine for cold weather starts? or at least a standard engine block heater that comes with a Honda car?"
Sunday
Lawrence Anderson left a comment for Lawrence Anderson
"No not yet would sure like to see one."
Sunday
John Bell left a comment for Lawrence Anderson
"Did you get a reply on units flying out west? Any flying in Ontario/Quebec?"
Sunday
Viking Aircraft Engines replied to Loren Warner's discussion Fuel Supply Line Aeroquip 601/AE701-6
"Short introduction:

What used to be the Viking "Auto Conversion" oddball system, using high pressure electric pumps, etc. is now the standard on Viking, UL and modern Rotax engines.

Funny how things change.



When UL came to town a few years back, the US distributor had no idea how to get this to work. Viking, being on the same airport, assisted with a dual fuel pump module, filters and regulator assembly. UL, still use this exact system, 6 years later. When the first injected Rotax was installed in a Zenith CruZer, the system became a nightmare of huge hoses, doorpost header tanks, fittings and clamps. All mounted inside the airplane cabin ? Viking has since moved on to produce an ultra modern, low amperage draw universal system for all these injected engines.

A typical system might seem logical like this:

In our Zenith 750, I already installed Aeroquip 601/AE701-6 as supply and return lines in the wings. We did this before selecting your Viking 130 engine. I'm concern…"
Sunday
Loren Warner replied to Loren Warner's discussion Fuel Supply Line Aeroquip 601/AE701-6
"Correction, the Aeroquip is 11/32" I.D., not 5/32". Also, the gascolator would be after the selector valve, but on the engine side of the firewall. After the gascolator, the low pressure filters and pumps would be mounted like what you show in your Viking 130 install video. Hope this makes more sense. Looking forward to hearing your detailed explanation."
Saturday
Charlie Rosenzweig replied to Randy Cechini's discussion 750 Weight and balance
"Randy,

I see it has been awhile. It would be great to hear how it turned out, but the battery install, as well as your weight and balance numbers. Post them here if you don't mind...."
Saturday
Steve Bray updated their profile photo
Saturday
Viking Aircraft Engines replied to Loren Warner's discussion Fuel Supply Line Aeroquip 601/AE701-6
"Wow, there is so much wrong with that system, I don't know where to start.
However, I will explain it in detail this weekend. Stand by."
Saturday
Loren Warner posted a discussion
In our Zenith 750, I already installed Aeroquip 601/AE701-6 as supply and return lines in the wings.  We did this before selecting your Viking 130 engine.  I'm concerned the 5/32" I.D. of this aeroquip fuel line may not be enough to supply your Viking 130?    Also, our preference is to route the fuel lines from each wing tank to a selector valve, via low pressure filters and a gascolator, with the fuel pumps mounted on the engine side of firewall.  Specifically: fuel tanks - low pressure filters - T'd to selector valve - gascolator (engine side firewall) - fuel pumps - high pressure filter - engine.Thank you,Loren 
Saturday
David Manuel updated their profile
Jan 10
David Manuel and R Michael Moore are now friends
Jan 10
Cecil Jimeson left a comment for Cecil Jimeson
"Viking 110 HP"
Jan 9
Lucien A.Pelletier left a comment for Cecil Jimeson
"What is your power plant in the CH701, I am building a 701 as well."
Jan 9
Lawrence Anderson left a comment for Lawrence Anderson
"Are there any Viking 130 HP engines flying in Alberta Canada that I could go see? I am getting close to ordering an engine and would like to see one installed and preferably flying. Even western Canada would be ok."
Jan 9
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Comments

  • The phone rang all day from builders having experienced first hand the effects of leaky gascolators vapor locking fuel pumps and aftermarket filters not working as advertised, etc.  

    So, what exactly is the perfect fuel system for an experimental aircraft, using an engine sporting electronically controlled fuel injection?

    We will answer this, using commercially available parts, without diving into the exotic such as pulse modulated fuel pumps, etc.  

    From our earlier example, it is clear that builders often view the system as a series of parts, arranged in sequence between the fuel tank and the engine.   

    These parts, in no specific order, are:

    Fuel tank, or tanks, fuel tank screens,  low pressure fuel filters - protecting the fuel pumps from contamination, a high pressure fuel filter - protecting the fuel injectors from small unwanted particles, a fuel regulator - sending unwanted / excess fuel back to the fuel tank, a fuel pressure transducer - providing pressure info to the pilot, switches and breakers to power each fuel pump, a fuel selector valve, lots of fittings, hoses, clamps, check valves, a gascolator, some drains, fuel pumps, 

    The latest viking systems have many of these parts but they are all in one location, eliminating the difficult distribution throughout the aircraft.  

    The ideal system has a pump that provide fuel to the engine, period.  No selector valves, no external pre-filters, no external regulators, no fuel drains outside the tanks, etc.

    It is called the VFPM  (Viking Fuel Pump Module)  

    The VFPM weight is about 1 lb.  It contains all of the parts mentioned above, in one location.  We will explain the VFPM in the next few days. 

  • My first engine start of my Viking 130 on a Rans S20 today with prop installed. I can't believe how smooth this engine runs and idles. Thanks Jan and crew for your great support and giving us a fantastic engine choice!
    • happy you were able to see it run in the cold.  

      Please make a video when you get time.  We are waiting for our S21 kit to be completed

  • Short introduction:

    What used to be the Viking "Auto Conversion" oddball system, using high pressure electric pumps, etc. is now the standard on Viking, UL and modern Rotax engines.

    Funny how things change.

     

    When UL came to town a few years back, the US distributor had no idea how to get this to work.  Viking, being on the same airport, assisted with a dual fuel pump module, filters and regulator assembly.  UL, still use this exact system, 6 years later.  When the first injected Rotax was installed in a Zenith CruZer, the system became a nightmare of huge hoses, doorpost header tanks, fittings and clamps.  All mounted inside the airplane cabin ?  Viking has since moved on to produce an ultra modern, low amperage draw universal system for all these injected engines.  

    A typical system might seem logical like this:

    In our Zenith 750, I already installed Aeroquip 601/AE701-6 as supply and return lines in the wings.  We did this before selecting your Viking 130 engine.  I'm concerned the 11/32" I.D. of this Aeroquip fuel line may not be enough to supply your Viking 130?    Also, our preference is to route the fuel lines from each wing tank to a selector valve with the fuel pumps mounted on the engine side of firewall.

    Specifically:

    fuel tanks, to

    selector valve, to

    gascolator (engine side firewall), to

    low pressure filters, to

    fuel pumps, to

    high pressure filter, to

    engine fuel rail.

    One missing item from the above list is a fuel pressure regulator.  We will assume it is after the high pressure pumps, routing the fuel back through the firewall, through a 6 port selector valve and back to the fuel tank in use at the time.  

    So, what is wrong with this system?

     Just about everything  :)

    1)  Fuel tank to selector valve:  

    The entire concept of a selector valve, using an injected engine with return fuel is flawed.  The $80  electric pickup truck style are flawed due to their poor quality.  The fancy 6 port $550  AndAir valves are not any better with return fuel leaking between valve sections, returning partial fuel to an unused tank - pumping it overboard if the tank is full.  If you insist on being able to control fuel from a L / R tank, simple on / off valves controlling fuel to a common header tank can be used.  A big issue with this is that sooner or later, someone will die from forgetting these valves.  Having just enough fuel to run a header tank dry after liftoff.  A system, using NO valves is best.

    2) Gascolator:

    For what ?  This is a useless item with any fuel system incorporating fuel return.  Water / dirt should be drained from the main tanks.  Any type of drain / filter is a huge liability to a secure fuel delivery to the fuel pumps.  Even a small fuel drain / gascolator gasket leak will cause the fuel pump to cavitate, sucking air, rather then fuel.   Also, no water can be collected in an item circulating fuel.  The instant a fuel pump has been turned on, (way before the engine is started), anything in the gascolator has returned to the tank.  The gascolator, being engine side of the firewall, mounted at the lowest point, exactly in the hot  cooling air exit of the entire engine, will boil the fuel at 115F, cavitating the high pressure pumps.  

    3) Low pressure filters

    Be very careful with filtration on the low pressure side of the pumps.  If they are in the engine compartment, they can not be plastic.  If they are metal, they will boil fuel and cause cavitation.  

    4) Fuel pumps

    If the fuel pumps are in the engine compartment, all low pressure lines leading to them must be shielded from heat.  The pumps themselves must also be shielded from heat.  This can only be done with a complete enclosure blasted with outside air.  

    5)  Returning fuel to the main tanks.  

    Do not return fuel to the main tanks, unless it is a single tank airplane.  Returning fuel to the main tank is not safe.  Most return systems, in order to maintain 45 psi of pressure to the engine, circulate 35 gallons / hr.  If the engine use 5 gph, 30 is not used and is pushed back to the tank.  If 30 is pushed back, 35 gph has to gravity flow to the pump every hour.  That is a lot of fuel to gravity flow through small hoses, a gascolator and a filter.  

    So, what is the better way ?

    Stand by for the next Viking Newsletter  

  • Is there a youtube video of the viking view data for the new viking 110 muffler?

  • What spinner is being used on the Onex installation picture below?

  • THE VIKING ONEX INSTALLATION

    8.2 GPH MAX POWER IS A DIRECT TESTAMENT TO THE POWER INCREASE USING THE LATEST VIKING 110 MUFFLER UPDATE

    KITFOX, SONEX AND S-19 GETTING "FREE" POWER

    TAILWIND GOING VIKING 170 TURBO

    VIKING LATEST FUEL SYSTEM, BETTER THAN ANY OTHER SYSTEM.  PUMP AMPERAGE DRAW ONLY 1.7A.  QUIET, SOLID 45 PSI, USABLE ON VIKING, UL AND ROTAX.  

    JUST AIRCRAFT SUPER STOL GOING VIKING 200 HP TURBO

    VIKING SEAREY WEEKEND PROJECT

    DICK PLAYING GOLF WHEN HE COULD BE FLYING HIS VIKING 130 CH-650?

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